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Some frizzy wig is standing in for Thalia's wild mane of black mohair curls, interspersed with plastic snakes. I like the voluminous curls; they soften her square features a bit. I also like the hair pulled back because then I can see her pointy ears.

What I don't like are those pointy tits. I'm not sure why so many sculptors insist on aggressively projecting nipples. I can't wait to get her a shirt.

Just for the heck of it, she's holding Beth, my smallest articulated doll.

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I am taking advantage of a true vacation to work on a list of doll projects that has expanded alarmingly in the past months. So far I have:
  • Derooted Cutey Honey's brittle, shedding default hair. When she went to the last VTDL meetup, I noticed that sad state of her hair and vowed to replace them. I don't have the appropriate replacement hair, so she's mostly bald at the moment. At least she's not shedding anymore, though.
  • Put Thalia on the body formerly belonging to Janvier Jett, painted her hands and gave her a temporary outfit.
  • Found a large, fabric-covered storage container at Goodwill and set it up on its side, thus converted it into a passable seat to accommodate long-limbed dolls like Jareth.
  • Improved Yamarrah
Yamarrah's hair was not sticking up enough, so I tacked down more of the long pieces.
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I mocked up a red wig for Timonium this morning. It's actually a digital hairstyle that I created, Aliza, serving as a computer-generated version of a wig I may want for him. I decided to embrace his resemblance to a small Goblin King. :D
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Orszebet for Genesis 2 Female

Daz Studio only

Tested only in Daz Studio Pro 4.6

64 bit.

Created with PhilC's Hair Designer,

Abalone LLC's Hair Shop Pro 1.0 and

a free tiling texture by MSTene,

this is my fourth freebie hairstyle

for Genesis 2 Female. Orszebet is a

layered wedge cut, longer in front

than in back, with a closely cut

nape.
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This was going to be a lavishly illustrated extravaganza, but I never got around to taking the requisite photos. Hopefully it'll help anyway...

--

Over in a Figurvore thread on an episode of Zombieville, katydid asked me about making a wig tutorial. Following are my comments on making wigs of faux fur for your dolls. I prefer [prefur? :p ] faux fur because its garish colors suit my signature LOUD style and its lofty pile hides my messy stitching and/or hot gluing. Rest assured, however, that you can still apply these techniques on naturalistic faux furs with neat and tidy results.

 
Please note: My method involves no measurement and lots of trial and error. If you want to find out how to make a fur wig by means of exact measurements, this is not the tutorial for you.
 
The construction of a faux fur divides into two sections. First, you create a pattern. Second, you actually make the wig.
 
 
Your average 1:6 scale action figure has a head somewhere between 3 and 4 inches in circumference. [Wigs are usually mentioned in inches; I’m not just being a chauvinist for imperial units here.] However, the head circumference varies widely from doll to doll, so I advocate the creation of a wig pattern specifically for your chosen doll.
 
 
Before I tell you how to make a wig, let’s discuss the grain of the faux fur -- also known as the direction in which the fibers lie.
 
 
The fur wig below is sewn with the grain of both sides pointing in the same direction. If the grain of the fur flows down from the crown, the hair on the wig will point down in compliance with gravity. This wig’s grain is pointing down from the crown. See below.
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If the grain of the fur flows up from the straight edges, the hair on the wig will point up with a nifty anti-grav effect. This wig’s grain is pointing up from the crown. See below.
 
 
Read more... )
 
 
The direction of the grain in your wig depends on what kind of effect you want, so I won’t tell you which way to make it point. Just check the grain before cutting.
 
 
Anyway, let’s make a pattern. To make a pattern, you will need faux fur, a pen or marker, a craft knife, either hot glue or needle and thread, scissors and scrap paper. You will also need a computer and access to a printer. Since you will be drafting several patterns [at least I was], use faux fur to which you are not particularly attached...or which you have a lot of.
 
 
Before you start cutting anything, print out the PDF pattern that I have supplied. It may be too big, too small, too shallow or too deep, but it will give you something to work with. Take note of the 1” line on the PDF. If you print out the PDF and that line does not measure 1”, you’ll need to reconfigure your printing options. If you print out the PDF and that line = 1”, congrats! You’re ready to start.
 
 
Cut out the PDF pattern. Note that it looks like two semicircles side by side. You’ll be stitching the curves together, while the straight edges may or may not be hemmed. Even if the wig created with this initial pattern ends up a bust, you can use this pattern as a basis for future alterations and experiments. Label it something like “Pattern #1.”
 
 
Now place the pattern on the backside of the faux fur.
 
Before you cut your faux fur, check the right side to see which way the grain of the fur is going. Yeah, I know we’re just making a pattern, not the final wig, but let’s get into the habit of checking before cutting.
 
 
Now that you have the grain of your faux fur pointing in the appropriate direction, trace around the pattern. Don’t worry too much about exactitude. I always like to leave a margin for hemming, as I can always trim things down, but I can’t magically increase the square area of fabric that’s too small!
 
 
Cut the wig shape out of the faux fur with a craft knife. The trick here is to cut the backing, but not the faux fur fibers themselves. I do this by either a) repeatedly stabbing the backside along the traced line to create perforations or b) holding the fur taut and then drawing the craft knife repeatedly over a small section of the traced line until it parts.
 
 
Now you can put the draft wig together. Fold the wig shape right side to right side so the result looks like a little cap or an upside-down pocket with all the fur on the inside. You can secure it in this doubled position either with pins or with your own grip. I find that pins get in my way, so I just hold the edges together.
 
 
Stitch along the curved edges of the folded wig shape, binding them together. Thread color is best chosen to blend in with the color of the fur. Blanket stitch is probably strongest, but since I wouldn’t know a blanket stitch if it made off with my blankets, I use a hemming stitch. Use a small needle, or else the needle + thread will just slide right through the holes you pierce.
 
 
Start your stitching NOT at the corner where arc of semicircle meets straight edge, but slightly above. You want to leave a little allowance for the seams along the straight edges.
 
Read more... )
 
 
 

Remember that you’re essentially creating the center part in the wig, so ensure that the halves of the wig shape are aligned evenly throughout your entire stitch, especially the bottom corners. Also try to keep your stitch an even distance from the edges of the paired semicircles, as great variation therein will make a lumpy, unrealistic center part.
 
 
End your center part stitching slightly above the second set of the semicircles’ corners. Again you’re leaving a little allowance for seams on the straight edges.
 
 
You can also fasten your wig shape together with hot glue along the matched arcs, but I do not recommend it. It’s very easy to push too much glue between the sides and create an uneven, bumpy part. Furthermore, hot glue will stiffen the faux fur so that it will not conform realistically to your doll’s head.
 
 
Now you have an inside-out wig with unfinished straight edges. Hem the straight edges by turning a small amount of faux fur under the inside edge. You can either sew it there or use hot glue. I’m impatient and easily bored, so, after I’ve sewn the center part of a wig, I usually finish off the straight edges with hot glue.
 
 
If all goes well, you can flip your creation inside-out and gaze with abject wonder upon your very own rough draft wig! Once you have gazed sufficiently, test fit the wig on your doll.
 
 
The rough draft wig will almost certainly not fit. The crown might be too high or too shallow, the sides too short or too long. Or perhaps everything looks good, but one side is longer than the other, or your stitching made some odd bump in the center part. Or, if you’re like me, you see several of these problems at once in the wig you’ve just completed.
 
 
Now comes the trial and error part. Take note of what adjustments you need to make and where you need to make them. I’m sure you could probably use a ruler or tape measure here for super precision, but I myself just eyeball it.
 
 
If you need to expand parts, it’s pretty easy. Trace your Pattern#1 shape [remember that?] onto a new piece of scrap paper. Draw the areas of expansion. Then cut around the new expanded outline to create a second draft of your wig pattern. Label “Pattern #2” and go through steps of wig construction as stated above.
 
If you need to reduce the size of certain parts, you can make a duplicate of Pattern#1, trim down as necessary, then use the trimmed pattern as a base for your next wig’s iteration.
 
 
Basically you keep drafting patterns and testing fits until you end up with a pattern that works.The trial and error helps you determine an exact fit, and it also helps you practice your sewing skills.
 
 
When you have made a pattern that finally fits the way you want it, label it “Final Draft” and then make a backup. Since I use notebook paper for my patterns, I reinforce my final pattern with some clear tape at the narrow section where the two hemispheres join. That way it won’t rip apart so easily.
 
 
Now go forth and make hair!
 
 
 

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I ripped out enough of Xandy's original purple bob so that the cropped remains would not show from under her lofty new wig. Since I had such fun designing my digital pompadour, Zabby, I decided to give Xandy an actual manifestation of the same style, with a few differences.
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Right here! I could do this! Lord knows I have enough fur. Maybe I could decorate her hair with little spiderwebs and bats...and a bird skull, if I can find one. :D
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Well, I mean that I have finished her wig and faceup. I still need to make her "I BELIEVE [in Champ]" shirt and her customized wheelchair. Maybe I should take some inspiration from one of my digital models and give her a steampunk power chair!!
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About a year ago, Doctor Z, the Zombieville denizen who diagnoses Isabel with spondis and tells her about the condition and the community of people who have it, started off as a Hasbro AA helo Jane with a very purple faceup.


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Yesterday I solidified Epona's leg joins by covering them with Aves Apoxie Sculpt. Today I painted those areas of her that will be visible under her clothes -- mostly breast and thighs -- to match the existing yellowish-tan coverage on her head and calves.

I also made her a tail with my ponytail pattern. This iteration makes some improvements on my first ponytail [for Anna]. I stitched this one almost all the way around, instead of using hot glue on the bottom edge. I also eschewed a straight pin as an armature, instead opting for plastic-coated wire. Finally, to ensure that the wire could not be seen in Epona's tail, I wrapped it in black embroidery floss to blend in with her fiber tail. Originally I thought that I would just jam it directly into her tail hole, but I created a little mount around her tail hole to extend the tail out a bit from her butt. This will make it fit more easily through her clothes. ^_^

I still need to coat her painted bust a few more times with matte varnish in hope of keeping it from chipping, especially around the neck. Then I need to blend the Aves Apoxie Sculpt on her legs in with the rest of her legs -- not on the upper thighs, since those will be covered by her shorts, but on her lower thighs, just above the knees, which will be visible. Once I sand that transition between added Aves Apoxie Sculpt and existing, I will paint and seal.

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I redid Anna's hair this weekend. Originally I gave her bangs and a ponytail that I made lie down with white glue, which made them look wet, sparse and stringy:Read more... )
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After I wrote my entry wondering what to do with her, I decided what to do with Epona. I finished rehairing her and stuck her on my CG 1.0 body with the broken ankle cup. She looks great! I have decided that I will transfer her calves/hooves from her old body to this body.
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So you thought it would be a clever idea to get drunk and go down with some of your frat brothers to the settlement of homeless PWS on Pine Street and post ZOMBIE CONTAINMENT AREA signs around the perimeter? Look at how unimpressed Lumberjack is with your puerile shit.
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I made Sheila a headcap today. I first made a core out of aliuminum foil and then covered it with Aves Apoxie Sculpt as necessary. The core gave my headcap more structural integrity and also saved me some Apoxie Sculpt. I'm surprised that I made the dead version of Isabel a functional headcap without a foil core!

Sheila also got a wig of brown faux fur, subdued with Mod Podge, with added bangs. She also got glasses.

Chaz, the Batchix Nan Sook that I first did, is at left, compared to Sheila at right. Now that I see them together, I know that I could put them in the same scene without any difficulty. Though they have the same basic headsculpt, they look plenty different. Chaz' bright clothes, raised eyebrows and smiling mouth give her an open, cheerful air. Sheila's open mouth, lowered eyebrows and glasses make her features seem narrower. Interestingly, Chaz looks more youthful to me than Sheila, even though Chaz is at least in her mid-20s and Sheila is somewhere between 8 and 12.
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I did all the improvements that I said I would on Delphine, and here she is [at right], done, with Béatrice [at left]. Showin' off one of my few faux furs in natural hair color!
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Yamarrah stole the wig I made for Jareth, as well as his glasses. Well, I guess that wig's not for him anymore... :p The glasses, however, he's not giving up so easily.

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But we knew that already. :p

Behold the glory of tacking with colored thread. Jareth's wig is made on the same principle as Yamarrah's: same fur, same stitching up of selected spikes to create an anti-grav look. This time, though, instead of using white thread all the way around, I employed my new colored threads to stitch up red spikes with red thread and orange with orange.

I also eschewed the Mod Podge for this one. Mod Podge helps the colors of Yamarrah's wig blend, thus looking more like flames, while Jareth's wig looks fluffier and more fiber-like and hair-like.

Jareth knows he looks hilarious, and he's down with that. ^_^

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I just made the first payment on Gloravnia today. I scheduled a 90-day layaway, but I will try mightily to pay it off in half that time.

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I tacked some more around her scalp and a lot on her sideburns, trying to make them less voluminous. I also put some Mod Podge in her bangs so that they appear to be affected by gravity. She has no clothes on because I took them off to wire her from her torso all the way down each of her legs and also through each arm.

I think her forelock needs tacking.
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Tacked more flyaways down. Combed out the spikes for more of a blended look. Glued in some red bangs, then pulled down some orange pieces for further bangs. Still need to sculpt the bangs a bit and, of course, the widow's peak and sideburns will lie flat against Yamarrah's skull when I'm done; I'll either glue them or use sticky tack on them after I do her faceup. Still, it's looking good!
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Last night I added a bit of bulk to one of the sideburns and stitched some flyaway locks to her wig cap so that they pointed upward. Still need to tame some errant strands, but it's looking much better now.

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Made another draft wig this morning out of pink fibers, cutting them with the grain so that the hair pointed down. I rolled under less of the edges so that this one was a bit bigger than the first draft, but still snug. Yamarrah models in the first picture, Jareth in the second.

Confident that my pattern would fit Yamarrah, I cut out her final wig from the yellow base fur with red and orange spikes. The third picture shows her hair before styling. I then saw that her hair sat high on her forehead, so I experimented with the addition of a widow's peak. The last picture shows her current hair after the addition of Mod Podge and widow's peak, a separate triangular piece of fur that I stitched in.

I still want to give her little pieces of loose hair hanging in front of her ears. I am satisfied with progress so far, though.


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I made my first 1:3 scale faux fur wig tonight! To create a pattern for Yamarrah's wig, I used Janvier Jett's wig, made by Akasarushi. I flipped it inside out, traced one half and reverse-engineered a simple pattern based on two semicircles side by side. Then I hot glued the edges under and stitched the center part. Had to rip out a stitch or two from the part at the back edge to make it fit, but otherwise it was the correct size. A successful first draft!

I noticed when I turned the wig right-side out that I had cut the draft wig against the grain of the fur, meaning that the hair was pointing up instead of down. Since I want Yamarrah to be a fire sprite, the resultant messy, anti-gravity look is actually pretty cool. It also adds to the 1980s air she has, I think.

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I've been puzzling over how to make wefts from the loose hair that I acquired from Georgia Landau in June. My uncertainty about how to make wefts explains why Alabama has been bald for months.

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I have finished salvaging all those earlier wigs that I could, cutting out the hot glue center parts and stitching in hand sewn ones. I have taken the opportunity to try various hairstyles. Some of them even came out looking good!
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I have been improving some of Isabel's wigs this afternoon by trimming off the hot glued center parts, tracing the remainder on my Isabel-specific pattern and hand sewing them instead.

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I have refined my wig making procedure. I used to hot-glue both the hairline edges and the center part. Hot glue, however, is not that flexible, so it often rendered the center part blocky and unrealistic. I changed from gluing the center part to hand sewing it. The results are more flexible, and they curve around the head naturalistically. I'm still hot gluing the hairline, though.
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I created a workable pattern for Isabel's wigs! This is the second one that I made with the pattern. Shockingly enough, I got tired of plain ol' magenta, so I added a purple understory for variety. Came out well!

I see that I need to even out the pink highlights on Isabel's lips. Will she ever be done?!


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I'm in the midst of making a wig pattern specifically for Isabel's oddly shaped head. Here's the latest iteration of the pattern, almost there, but with too much bulk and height in the front hairline. Isabel looks great with 3" magenta shag as hair, though!

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I redid Béatrice's faceup over the past few days, as well as her hair. She used to have a faceup in unsealed Prismacolor colored pencil and no hair at all. Her faceup wore away with handling, however. I also found her blindingly white skin difficult to photograph. To cut down on the amount of blindingly white skin she shows, I made her a coordinating wig when I redid her faceup.

Faceup consists of the following: brown watercolor pencil for eyebrows, lashes and shading around nose, neon purple over neon pink acrylic for eyeshadow, neon pink with neon purple line for mouth, pink colored pencil for blush. Wig is faux fur with a blue 1" base, originally with 3" pink and purple spikes. I trimmed the spikes down to 1" as well and gave Béatrice bangs.

Everyone in Zombieville achieves a minimum level of loud tackiness, but Béatrice is especially loud and flamboyant. I mean, she wears neon lipstick, for shit's sake! She also chooses, as a cancer survivor who has lost her hair to radiation, to wear a tricolor wig. Plus she is actually really loud and pushy, in part because she is used to being literally overlooked.

She still needs her chandelier earrings.

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Making wigs out of poodle shag faux fur requires more patience than making fur wigs out of regular faux fur. I finally achieved acceptable results for Chaz [top] and Doctor Z [bottom].

To work with the poodle shag, I marked the pattern with lightly sketched pen, which did not bleed through the backing as much as my usual marker, a Sharpie permanent. I also cut large to compensate for the poodle shag backing's lack of stretch. I also glued in small pieces to the finished wigs to fill in any bare areas, which appear more readily with poodle shag, as it is sparser than straight fur fibers. Finally, in Chaz' case, I quickly whipped a light application of diluted Mod Podge through her hair so that it kept its loft and kink, but maintained more of a definite shape. I left Doctor Z's hair loose, as I'm going for an Einsteinian air with her.

I'm very pleased with the poodle shag wigs I've made. The kinky fibers work well for in-scale, small, tight curls. I accomplished what I wanted to do -- make wild hair for Doctor Z -- and now I have little incentive to work with the remaining scraps, especially since they're so difficult.

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Look what I got today! Faux fur for Yamarrah's hair! Initially she was going to have black/red/purple zigzag hair, but, as I decided she is a fire elemental, I wanted to continue the orange coloration beginning on her semi-transparent hands. Incidentally, I wanted this to be the material for Mellifer's wig, but it was sold out when I was ready to buy, so he got a purple base with orange and yellow spikes instead.

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I got a shipment from LuxuryFauxFur, my preferred source, on Etsy today. First up were two large sheets of 3" magenta and bluish purple. They're huge!

The purple is for Pearlene, while the magenta is for Isabel and for the satisfaction of the general dearth of REALLY BRIGHT PINK faux fur in my stockpile.
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Clearly I need a better system for organizing my faux fur supplies. I currently jam all the swatches and completed wigs in one of my purple plastic drawers, but they are rapidly outgrowing that space. My larger sheets of fur [currently grey, purple base with orange and yellow spikes, purple/red/black zigzag, magenta and purple, with yellow base and red and orange spikes incoming] are just shoved into a plastic bag, which they have outgrown as of today.

I really enjoy working with faux fur. I like that it comes in all colors, from colors that would occur in hair naturally, to colors achieved only with the use of dyes. I like that it is lightweight and made of fiber, so it can be easily styled like real hair. I like that it responds equally well to hot glue or to needle and thread. I like that I can produce really cool results very quickly. In contrast to doll hair, which I find heavy, plasticky, tedious and frustrating to work with, not to mention unrealistic in weight, faux fur wins out for me every time.

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I mark the beginning of my doll customizing career with my first 1:6 scale Jareth doll, which I created in November and December of 2001 as an Xmas present for Jill. [After all these years, she still has him! He hangs out with her 1:6 scale dolls who use wheelchairs.] Let's see how far I've come....

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I made a wig for Cola last night out of my grey faux fur with 3" pile. I accidentally cut it against the grain of the fur so that the hair sticks up straight, but I decided that vertical hair suits Cola's energetic personality. I also tried shortening her hair with about 85% success. Here's what a wig made of the uncut 3" grey looks like on Doctor Z [whose hair was also cut from the fur so that it is pointing down]:


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Her outfit and her hair weren't doing her any favors, so I improved them. Her faceup also needs refinement. I like the features, but the coloring is a little messy. I need to touch up her lips and the lines around her nose. Her eyebrows and eye bags, however, are perfect! She's so cute.

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Her shiny purple face made her really difficult to photograph, so I wiped it this weekend and redid her. The darkness of her complexion, again, makes it hard for me to photograph her, but some highlighting helps pick out her features.

She also got new hair, the volume of which I reduced by flattening it with some Mod Podge. I also gave her a different top so she's showing a little more skin.


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Because all the fibers in my haul from Georgia Landau contained dust and stink, they required lengthy preparations before use. First, I picked out all the stray threads, vegetable matter and pieces of fabric. Then I gave them a quick wash in lukewarm water with some dish soap. Finally I aired out the hanks on my clothesline [a very useful addition to our new apartment!] for several hours. Though I still need to comb out the fibers I intend to use, I can now work with them without sneezing my head off.Read more... )
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The wools I got from Georgia Landau have been sitting in dusty bags for untold years, so they have dust on them, as well as a musty smell. I have removed them from the bags I bought them in, but I still want to wash them before use. After some online research, I have decided that a quick dunk and swish in hot water with dish soap would be most effective, followed by drying on my drying rack.

Also in doll-related news, I discovered that I can hasten the 24-hour curing time of Aves Apoxie Sculpt by sticking my items in the oven on 200 degrees for, say, 15 minutes!


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Out of the blue, earlier this month, I received an E-mail from figural sculptor Georgia Landau, asking me if I wished to buy some of her dollmaking supplies. After decades of making dolls, primarily in porcelain, she has moved onto clay, leaving behind wool and other fibers, fabrics, furniture and other odds and ends. Unable to make her official Saturday moving sale, I trekked to Montpelier Friday after work in driving rain to examine the goods.Read more... )
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When we last saw Brandeis, she had no faceup, a different wig and a different outfit. Now she has a faceup [all brown and a little pink for the lips], a black-based wig instead of a white-based one and a different outfit. I ditched her hat and changed her pants and shoes. She's adorable! Love her little legwarmers with hearts. <3 <3 The simplicity of her faceup brings out the lively detail in her sculpt.

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This is why I got Timonium: he looks Jarethian.

[Remade his wig last night with less bulk around the crown.]Read more... )

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I had some time on Monday to get around to some of those doll projects that have been in suspension since my packing and moving.
Among other things, I made improvements to Timonium. I moved the snap on his skirt so that it fits more snugly around his hips.

I also rewired him with two thick pieces of wire down his neck, through his upper torso, lower torso, then one wire down each of his thighs. After drilling channels down each of his solid fairy feets so that the wires could run past his knee joints, I found him a much more solid poser.

Timonium got a new wig too. My wig skills are definitely improving, as this one fit snugly around the edges. However, the scalp is too deep. I'm not sure if I will correct this, as I like the bulk of wild hair springing from his head and surrounding his face.

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An orgy of hot pink, lime green and electric blue! I'm gonna pretend Isabel made it for her. ^_^

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More fur wigs with the tricolored swatches I've had lying around the house. Isabel looks good in pretty much anything, but I like the ones with the red bases the best. She's bad ass!!

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I got a shipment of maybe 15 swatches of faux fur recently, including a bunch of new color schemes. I chose my favorite and made some more fur wigs this afternoon.

The ones in vibrant colors look different than the earlier set of vibrant colors because these have all fibers the same length. The first set of vibrant colors had short bases with longer spikes in different color. As a result, the first set provided lots of color without adding bulk. But the current set of vibrant colors adds bulk, thus making the hair less likely to respond to simple styling. That said, I love the tricolor zigzag pattern, from which all of the vibrant ones in this set are made. My current favorite, usurping even the white base with pink and green spikes, is a pink/purple/green zigzag at top right.Read more... )

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I started working on Isabel's faceup last night, but eventually swapped her out to a Soom Uyoo body, as the Elfdoll Doona Ryung body she came with was weirding me out with its childlike proportions. Though her temporary body represents a shape Isabel has never had, it certainly disturbs me less than seeing the head of a 35-year-old on a 7-year-old's body.Read more... )

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It's constructed, as usual, entirely from faux fur and HOT GLUE. Having perfected my pattern before dinner, I made another wig after dinner for Novella in the colors that I originally intended for her: pink base, with spikes of neon green and royal purple. I like it much better than the black-based one.

As you can see, awesomeness has now been achieved.


Prepare yourself! )


I just hit LuxuryFauxFur, distinctivefabric.com's Etsy outpost, for 13 more 3 x 5" swatches of faux fur, setting me back a whole $3.60. Now that I have a working wig pattern, I can get about 3 1:6 scale wigs to a swatch, which means that I will soon have way more faux fur than I will ever need. But you can never have too many swatches of cool fabric. Coming to me eventually are the following:
  • Tricolor zigzag stripes in the following combinations: black/purple/turquoise, pink/neon green/royal purple, pink/black/red.
  • Two-color blends in the following combinations: black/magenta, black/grey, black/reddish tan.
  • Tricolor spiked shag fur [of the style used above] in the following combinations: brown/black/green, brown/black/red, brown/black/light blue, black/blue/purple, neon green/pink/royal purple, red/blue/green, red/blue/black.
I'm very curious to see how the zigzag patterns work out in a small wig.
modernwizard: (Default)
That is, instead of adding strips of fur after the fact, as I did with Mellifer's. Anyway, it really was a single piece of fur, as I turned inside-out a Soom fur wig that I had and reverse-engineered a pattern from it. Here's Novella in my first truly successful fur wig. I find black fur more forgiving than colored fur, as black fur is attached to a black background, the raw edges of which show up less starkly than that of colored furs, which have white backgrounds [in contrast to the colored furs themselves].Read more... )

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