modernwizard: (Default)
  • United Parenting Publications/parenthood.com: "A Sensational 'Seussentennial!'" Published March, 2004.
  • Out in the Mountains: "Pulp Fiction and Lesbian Rights." Published October, 2004.
  • Tangent Online: The Fair Folk, edited by Marvin Kaye. Reviewed August 17, 2006.
  • Trends: "Alternatives to Fossil Fuels." Published January, 2008.
  • The Fix Online: The Duke in His Castle, by Vera Nazarian. Reviewed June 15, 2008.
  • Sociological Images: "Only Hearts Club Dolls: Alternatives to Barbie and Bratz." Published December 30, 2008.
  • hasbro shoezies: the definitive resource. Published February, 2010.
  • The Portal: "An Interview with Lavie Tidhar." Published September 15, 2011.
  • Mary's Diary: Courting, Schooling, and Skating in Mid-Victorian Plattsburgh, New York. 2011. Available in print and online in the Feinburg Library Special Collections at SUNY Plattsburgh.
modernwizard: (Default)
Body my house
my horse my hound
what will I do when you are fallen

Where will I sleep
How will I ride
What will I hunt

Where can I go
without my mount
all eager and quick
How will I know
in thicket ahead
is danger or treasure
when Body my good
bright dog is dead

How will it be
to lie in the sky
without roof or door
and wind for an eye

With cloud for shift
how will I hide?


Swenson does the best poetry of the body. I love the enjambment in "Body my good / bright dog is dead." It's like the speaker loves life so much that she actually breaks off in the middle of the thought before getting to "dead" because she's so stuck on the goodness and brightness of being an embodied being. I also like the phrase "wind for an eye" because it implicitly continues the house metaphor by subtly recalling the etymology of "window," from Old Norse "vindauga," or "wind's eye."

modernwizard: (Default)
...which is A Christmas Tree, which I think somehow cheapens the whole thing by making it some trite, pallid God metaphor.

A Christmas Tree
by William Burford


Star,
if you are
A love compassionate,
You will walk with us this year.
We face a glacial distance, who are here
Huddld
At your feet.


I like the personification of the astronomical body, the begging of warmth across the chill of space, the abject genuflection of the insignificant people [who are so insignificant that they can't buy another vowel for "Huddld"]. It's a desperate and rather hopeless plea.
modernwizard: (Default)
The dude generally pisses me off with his fucking stupid misogyny and gender essentialism, not to mention racism, but I do love this poem:

Death Is Not Evil, Evil Is Mechanical

Only the human being, absolved from kissing and strife
goes on and on and on, without wandering
fixed upon the hub of the ego
going, yet never wandering, fixed, yet in motion,
the kind of hell that is real, grey and awful
sinless and stainless going round and round
the kind of hell grey Dante never saw
but of which he had a bit inside him.

Know thyself, and that thou art mortal.
But know thyself, denying that thou art mortal:
a thing of kisses and strife
a lit-up shaft of rain
a calling column of blood
a rose tree bronzey with thorns
a mixture of love and hate
a wind that blows back and forth
a creature of beautiful peace, like a river
and a creature of conflict, like a cataract:
know thyself, in denial of all these things --

And thou shalt begin to spin round on the hub of the obscene ego
a grey void thing that goes without wandering
a machine that in itself is nothing
a centre of the evil world.


Frankly, I ignore the fact that someone's been reading too much Freud and return to this poem for the middle part: the quintessence of glorious, vacillating humanity. "A calling column of blood" -- what a perfect evocation of our physicality and our longing for emotional connection.

D.H. Lawrence really hates machines... He especially has it out for electric wheelchairs [ref. Clifford Chatterley]. Fuck off, D.H. Lawrence!


modernwizard: (Default)
A word sticks in the wind's throat;
A wind-launch drifts in the wells of rye;
Sometimes, in broad silence,
The hanging apples distill their darkness.

You, in a green dress, calling, and with brown hair,
Who come by the field-path now, whose name I say
Softly, forgive me love if also I call you
Wind's word, apple-heart, haven of grasses.


I love the language here, especially the "wind-launch," with its connotations of air caught in the depths of long grasses. And the apples, "distill[ing] their darkness" -- what does that mean? I think of tangy fermentation, cider, fall, secrecy, something somber, witnessing and slightly menacing.

And that enjambment in the second stanze -- "whose name I say / Softly " -- wow! A word sticks in the speaker's throat as a word sticks in the wind's throat. It's such a regretful poem, a melancholy evocation of thwarted feeling.

modernwizard: (Default)
Translated from Russian by Avrahm Yarmolinsky.

My favorite paragraph is, incidentally, the last:

And it seemed as though, in a little while, the solution would be found, and then a new and glorious life would begin; and it was clear to both of them that the end was still far off, and that what was to be most complicated and difficult for them was only just beginning.

modernwizard: (Default)
Hey look -- a book! April Hamilton offers on-screen views of The IndieAuthor Guide for free.
modernwizard: (Default)
Wow, a whole antho about "fantastical tales of gender-bending, cross-dressing and transformation!" It's an anthology made for MW! I even have two stories that I can submit: The Storyteller and The Strange Imagination. Of course, I won't get published in this book, but how can I pass up the chance???
modernwizard: (Default)
Because why should you pay for something when you can get it for free?

http://www.creativewritingprompts.com/
329 prompts for creative writing, just like it says in the URL. Sample: "What story can you come up with that has this quick plot: cancer comes back after three years of remission?"

http://www.writersdigest.com/WritingPrompts/ 10 pages of prompts from Writer's Digest. Sample: "You wake up in jail and have no memory of how you got there. As you pace around the cell, you find five items in your pocket from the night before. As you look at each piece, the night slowly comes back to you. Write about your night, why you have these five items and how you ended up in jail."

http://www.creativity-portal.com/prompts/imagination.prompt.html
The Imagination Prompt Generator randomly generates writing prompts for personal non-fiction writing. Sample: "My 10 favorite movies."

http://www.creative-writing-solutions.com/creative-writing-prompts.html A page of creative writing prompts from Creative Writing Solutions. Sample: "A jewel-encrusted box is found in an ancient abandoned temple. Describe the box, what is in the box, and the temple. See where it takes you."

http://www.writingfix.com/right_brain.htm WritingFix's collection of generators for prompts. Sample: "An intimidating snail was slipping past my ice cream."

http://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/892558 51 prompts collected by a writer. Sample: "Read the following line and create a short story or poem using it as the opening line. And then she died. (Thanks to the Muse's Alley for providing the line.)."

http://www.mcsweeneys.net/2006/5/4wiencek.html 13 Suggestions from mcsweeneys.net. Sample: "Write a short scene set at a lake, with trees and shit. Throw some birds in there, too.."

http://www.fifteenminutesoffiction.com/prompts.asp
Fifteen Minutes of Fiction's index of weekly writing prompts. Sample:
"Write the events or conversations you imagine might happen if two famous people from different centuries were able to meet."




modernwizard: (Default)
  • Out in the Mountains: "Pulp Fiction and Lesbian Rights." Published October, 2004.
  • Tangent Online: The Fair Folk, edited by Marvin Kaye. Reviewed August 17, 2006.
  • Trends: "Alternatives to Fossil Fuels." Published January, 2008.
  • Sociological Images: "Teddy Bears Substitute for Emotional Work." Published December 18, 2008.
modernwizard: (Default)
  • United Parenting Publications/parenthood.com: "A Sensational 'Seussentennial!'" Published March, 2004.
  • Out in the Mountains: "Pulp Fiction and Lesbian Rights." Published October, 2004.
  • Tangent Online: The Fair Folk, edited by Marvin Kaye. Reviewed August 17, 2006.
  • The Fix Online: "Petits Fours, Scrimshaw, and Training Bikes: Metaphors for Short Stories, An Interview with Ellen Klages." Published March 15, 2008.
  • Trends: "Alternatives to Fossil Fuels." Published January, 2008.
  • Sociological Images: "Teddy Bears Substitute for Emotional Work." Published December 18, 2008.
  • hasbro shoezies: the definitive resource. Published February, 2010.
  • The Portal: "An Interview with Lavie Tidhar." Published September 15, 2011.
modernwizard: (Default)
Associated Content
  • Labyrinth Special Edition DVD: Worth $50? Published October 27, 2005.
  • Film Adaptation of C.S. Lewis' Narnia A Pleasant Surprise. Published December 8, 2005.
  • Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls: Collecting These Dolls Is a Great Hobby. Published January 18, 2006.
Clarion Reviews
  • Camille Claudel: A Novel, by Alta Brown. Reviewed winter, 2005.
  • Past the Line, by E.T. Milligan. Reviewed winter, 2005.
  • An Unchaste Life: Memoir of a Tudor Queen, by Anne Cato. Reviewed spring, 2006.

Curve Magazine
  • Page Turners [various short book reviews]. Published April, 2007.
  • Page Turners [various short book reviews]. Published, May, 2007.

Dollicieux
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part I. Published January, 2006.
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part II: Published February, 2006.
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part III. Published April, 2006.

The Fix Online 
  • So Fey: Queer Fairy Fiction, edited by Steve Berman. Reviewed October 13, 2007.
  • Heroes in Training, edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Jim C. Hines. Reviewed October 21, 2007.
  • Inferno: New Tales of Terror and the Supernatural, edited by Ellen Datlow. Reviewed December 7, 2007.
  • Petits Fours, Scrimshaw and Training Bikes: Metaphors for Fiction -- An Interview with Ellen Klages. [Includes discussion of Portable Childhoods by Ellen Klages.] Published March 15, 2008.
  • The Duke in His Castle, by Vera Nazarian. Reviewed June 15, 2008.
Out in the Mountains
  • Spring Fire, by Vin Packer. Reviewed October, 2004.
  • Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks, edited by Emily Pohl-Weary. Reviewed January, 2005.
  • Light Before Day, by Christopher Rice. Reviewed April, 2005.

Sociological Images
  • "Race, Class and Gender in the American Girl Empire." Published September 8, 2008.
  • "Teddy Bears Substitute for Emotional Work." Published December 18, 2008.
  • "Only Hearts Club Dolls: Alternatives to Barbie and Bratz." Published December 30, 2008.


Tangent Online
  • Fantasy & Science Fiction, February 2006 issue. Reviewed December 29, 2005.
  • Fantasy & Science Fiction, March 2006 issue. Reviewed January 30, 2006.
  • Modern Magic: Tales of Fantasy and Horror, edited by W.H. Horner. Reviewed June 25, 2006.
  • The Fair Folk, edited by Marvin Kaye. Reviewed August 17, 2006.
  • Escape From Earth: New Adventures in Space, edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. Reviewed November 15, 2006.
  • North of Infinity II, edited by Mark Leslie. Reviewed November 15, 2006.

Trends
  • "Alternatives to Fossil Fuels." Published winter, 2008.
  •  "Guest Editorial: Will a $900 Million Shot in the Arm Make the Environment Any Cleaner?" [co-written with Kurt Herman] Published spring, 2009.

United Parenting Publications / parenthood.com
  • "A Sensational 'Seussentennial!'" Published March, 2004.
  • "Mommy, I Want that SpongeBob Macaroni and Cheese!" Published December, 2004.
  • "Family Fun When the Days Get Shorter." Published winter, 2005.
modernwizard: (Default)
  • United Parenting Publications: 2004-2005
  • Out in the Mountains: 2004-2005
  • Associated Content: 2005
  • Clarion Reviews: 2005-2006, 2008-present
  • Tangent Online: 2005-2007
  • Dollicieux: 2006
  • Curve Magazine: 2007
  • The Fix Online: 2007-present
  • Sociological Images: 2008-present
  • Kirkus Discovery: 2008-present
  • Trends: 2008-2009

Hmm, not bad for a side interest spanning 4 years. My work at Sociological Images has been the most enjoyable, since I get to dissect bits of pop culture whenever I feel like it.
modernwizard: (Default)
I should hunt some up and scan them [mostly from the end of 2007]. None of them are online because they were short book reviews in the print editions. Anyway, the main branch of Cambridge Public Library has back issues. Now I need to find out where the main branch is temporarily housed....
modernwizard: (Default)
Associated Content
  • Labyrinth Special Edition DVD: Worth $50? Published October 27, 2005.
  • Film Adaptation of C.S. Lewis' Narnia A Pleasant Surprise. Published December 8, 2005.
  • Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls: Collecting These Dolls Is a Great Hobby. Published January 18, 2006.
Clarion Reviews
  • Camille Claudel: A Novel, by Alta Brown. Reviewed winter, 2005.
  • Past the Line, by E.T. Milligan. Reviewed winter, 2005.
  • An Unchaste Life: Memoir of a Tudor Queen, by Anne Cato. Reviewed spring, 2006.

Curve Magazine
  • Page Turners [various short book reviews]. Published April, 2007.
  • Page Turners [various short book reviews]. Published, May, 2007.

Dollicieux
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part I. Published January, 2006.
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part II: Published February, 2006.
  • Dolls With Souls: The Power of Asian Ball-Jointed Dolls, Part III. Published April, 2006.

The Fix Online 
  • So Fey: Queer Fairy Fiction, edited by Steve Berman. Reviewed October 13, 2007.
  • Heroes in Training, edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Jim C. Hines. Reviewed October 21, 2007.
  • Inferno: New Tales of Terror and the Supernatural, edited by Ellen Datlow. Reviewed December 7, 2007.
  • Petits Fours, Scrimshaw and Training Bikes: Metaphors for Fiction -- An Interview with Ellen Klages. [Includes discussion of Portable Childhoods by Ellen Klages.] Published March 15, 2008.
  • The Duke in His Castle, by Vera Nazarian. Reviewed June 15, 2008.
Out in the Mountains
  • Spring Fire, by Vin Packer. Reviewed October, 2004.
  • Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks, edited by Emily Pohl-Weary. Reviewed January, 2005.
  • Light Before Day, by Christopher Rice. Reviewed April, 2005.
  • Beauty and Darkness: An Interview with Susie Wizowaty. [Includes review of A Tour of Evil, by Susie Wizowaty.] Published November, 2005.

Tangent Online
  • Fantasy & Science Fiction, February 2006 issue. Reviewed December 29, 2005.
  • Fantasy & Science Fiction, March 2006 issue. Reviewed January 30, 2006.
  • Modern Magic: Tales of Fantasy and Horror, edited by W.H. Horner. Reviewed June 25, 2006.
  • The Fair Folk, edited by Marvin Kaye. Reviewed August 17, 2006.
  • Escape From Earth: New Adventures in Space, edited by Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois. Reviewed November 15, 2006.
  • North of Infinity II, edited by Mark Leslie. Reviewed November 15, 2006.
modernwizard: (Default)
I would apply to be a freelance reviewer at the Horn Book Guide if I could just stay awake zzzzzzzzzz....
modernwizard: (Default)

I fed my LJ tags into Wordle and came up with the following tag cloud. See it here. 

I should run some of my stories through it.

modernwizard: (Default)

The online version of Online Poetry, Genius edition, certainly has a lot of vituperative terms in it... Either that or it's just so much fun to denigrate someone with polysyllables.

modernwizard: (Default)
Working exhaustedly with the online Poet supply of words from Magnetic Poetry's Web site.

modernwizard: (Default)
It's hard to concentrate at work. [No, really??] Forthwith, some spew from the online Romantic selection of Magnetic Poetry [TM]. I like the sharpened tongue the best...it's the little inhuman touches that are most effective... :p I notice that all of my fridge poetry appears to be about death, disturbance and violence. Or sex. Or several of the above. WOOOOO HOOOOOO!
modernwizard: (Default)
 I was just messing with Magnetic Poetry's online Garden suite of words. I was trying to see how much I could pervert it. I think I succeeded. This one is for all you vampires out there....
modernwizard: (Default)
I checked out a fridge poetry community, but all the entries were too serious and/or pretentious, so I left for Magnetic Poetry, which has a Web site where you can futz with some of the kits. I used the Genius edition, which is more like the Regular Vocabulary edition for me. I like "tinged with galling language" and "tantamount to temerity" the best. They just speak trippingly on the tongue, you know. Tantamount and temerity are good words to eject contemptuously and if you get them both together you just have a veritable mortar spray of plosives!
modernwizard: (Default)
Figured out the peculiarity of Magnetic Poetry. With its preponderance of adjectives, it has no association with workaday language, so it all but requires a) endless concatenations of nouns and adjectives or b) strings of adjectives that you would not expect to go together. Case in point is today's effort. Also I swear that I didn't set out to write about cunnilingus. I just realized after that the last clause could be interpreted that way.
modernwizard: (Default)
...Continuing the tradition of complete and grammatically correct sentences created with Magnetic Poetry [TM]. Not particularly inspired by anything, except we had all the adjectives collected together, so fast, true and black were nearby.
modernwizard: (Default)
We have long had magnetic alphabets on our fridge, but those have only so much entertainment value because we quickly reach the limit of 52 letters [2 alphabets]. When we moved into our new apartment, I bought some magnetic poetry. I enjoy using it, but then I want to preserve my stupid creations for all eternity, which prevents me from raping them for recombination. So I've decided to photograph the results of my magnetic maundering. As you can see, it's all in character: long sentences that take unexpected turns as they tell fantastic stories burbling with unusual conflict.
modernwizard: (Default)
I ended up ditching the Zire/Palm keyboard combo in favor of a Clie + Clie keyboard, a cheaper set [$75 for both, including Documents to Go, which is the portable version of Word] with more technological advances. On the Clie, there is also a hard plug-in connection between PDA and keyboard, as opposed to the fiddly infrared sensor on the Zire/Palm keyboard set-up. Thank you to Super Todd, my landlord, who sold it to me.

Since last night I have been experimenting with data entry onto my new mini-'puter. The cramped keys take some getting used to, but they're responsive, requiring no pounding, so they're not too hard on my hands. If I type quickly for an extended period of time, my wrists hurt, but they do that anyway with laptop or desktop boards. So far, my mini-'puter appears to satisfy my need for light, compact, quickly accessible and comtaible word processing. Further updates as I continue testing.
modernwizard: (Default)
Used Palm Zire 31: $60. Thank you, craigslist.

Palm universal wireless keyboard from provantage.com: $48.48.

Total: $108.48.

Result: something better and more compatible than the Alphasmart Neo for less than half the price. Take THAT, Alphasmart! I thought you were cheap, but your prices are clearly inflated. Look at my smart little back-lit cheapo computer with several MB of memory and more than 4 lines of text and an almost laptop-size keyboard. You are not as good as that. Weep for shame. WEEP!
modernwizard: (Default)
Alternatively, I could get a portable folding keyboard [Pocketop] and a cheap PDA. Pocketop keyboard for $20 here. Cheap, universal, but has small keys. Palm universal wireless keyboard here at $40. Keys small for extensive typing? More expensive infrared keyboard for $45 here. Nice size, but more small moving parts, stupid non-locking hinge.
modernwizard: (Default)
Introducing the latest tag, "writing," which covers my Sarah and Milly story [formerly tagged "nanowrimo," which it no longer is right now] and any other dreck I spew out.

I have a novel to write, but I dislike typing it onto my home desktop computer. First, I spend all day at my job at a desktop, so spending more time in front of another desktop is the last thing I want to do. Second, the large screen size of the desktop monopolizes my vision, allowing me no chance to look at anything interesting or restful besides the screen. Third, the desktop limits me to one place, at my desk, in my chair. It's not portable.

I have several alternatives. One of them is a notebook, a regular paper notebook. A notebook is good because it provides variation [not staring at another big screen], no monopoly on my vision and portability, it increases the amount of time I spend writing because I think have to transfer the writing to the computer by banging it out on the keys. So basically handwriting only staves off the inevitable suffering of using the desktop. I don't want to stave it off. I want to avoid it as much as possible.

Another alternative is a laptop computer. A laptop computer is good because it provides variation, no monopoly on my vision and compatibility with the desktop. However, I want something light and easy to carry to work and on trips. A laptop is too heavy and fragile, not to mention uselessly complicated. I don't need huge amounts of memory or great programs. I just want to enter text and then transfer it to my desktop.

Another alternative is a handheld with a fold-out keyboard. This would be good because it provides variation, portability and ease of use. But it is too complicated and fragile, and the screen would be too small.

The final option, the Alphasmart Neo, is what I want to go with. It's a small, light, durable word processor with a full-size keyboard and a 6-lines-of-text screen. it has a small amount of memory and can communicate with my desktop via USB cord. It doesn't figure my taxes or connect to the Internet. It just holds medium-sized text files. That's all I want. I don't want to handwrite my stories. I'm saving manuscript for my diary [except on those rare occasions when I forget it and have to type up and print out an entry, then paste it in].

Lookit how cheap they are!

Now if you'll excuse me, I must return to manuscripting my latest outline because I do not have an Alphasmart Neo yet.

Tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit